Advertisement
<< Back To Article
Is Curing Patients Good for Business? Asks Goldman Sachs Biotech Report

Write a Comment

I have read and agree to the terms and conditions in the Posting Rules*

9 Comments

rdy4newchapter

@pharma_developer, Your job may make you money to pay the bills and your intentios may be good. But the big picture is to drag out the income from AIDS as a whole. They cured AIDS and Cancer using 1 surgery. It does not make sense to find additional cures . How about they just perfect doing this surgery. How about go all in on the answer. Looking for additional answers is a waste of time and money while people are dying. Everything we need to know we learn in early childhood: right and wrong

May 2, 2018 Inland Empire

Markg

It is refreshing to see that there are scientific and medical people with a moral conscious, but you must be paid as must the people and companies that risk all - otherwise there is no incentive to experiment and produce. The expiry of patent is the intervention to the free market that stops market fixing and reduces prices through generics; HIV meds included. Pharma must therefore be always working on new discovery. The incentive will be to hopefully cure everyone before patent expiry...

April 25, 2018 Auckland

Nick43

This is old news. We know that most, if not all, of these people are only concerned with their investment portfolios. Why do you think they fought to stop drug holidays? It's never been about the wellbeing of the patient. It's always been about quarterly profits. Stop wasting your money on a lost cause. Donate to a food bank, not "cure" research. Remember CRISPR? They will never allow it to work for us.

April 23, 2018 OKC

ready4newchapter

You know this the way it is, and it is no secret. I mean ,being positive, when im at the checkstand at the grocery store and i hear them ask if i want to donate to help cure HIV, all i can do is laugh even though it makes me sick. Its just a joke because unless they are practicing perfecting the stem cell surgery they did on the berlin patient, then i am not hearing them . I mean this guy was cured of AIDS and Cancer in one shot. I'd be the next test subject right now.

April 19, 2018 Inland Empire

mwarriner

Once again, it looks like a case of "follow the money." Can it be different with HIV? Probably not. We've got drugs that should lead to a decrease in new cases. But those drugs are expensive for those of us who are living with HIV. That gravy train for big pharma will continue until we age out and die of other causes, which means there's a lot more money to be made while we wait for a cure. Discouraging.

April 19, 2018 California

Andy f

Lol ok guys the Pharma employee swears they’re altruistic. Just disregard all observed behavior all common sense and this paper...

April 19, 2018 Cleveland oh

pharma_development

Furthermore, the premise is based on a bad assumption. It assumes that if the company developed a drug that was for long-term maintenance, that the company would continue to bring in high revenue. Thankfully due to limited exclusivity periods, generics drive down the price of therapy, and the original innovator loses the revenue anyway. One could argue that gene therapy is too expensive to create a generic for, but thankfully there is also the pressure of competition that drives development.

April 18, 2018

pharma_developer

This type of thinking makes me sick. As a clinical scientist who works for a large pharmaceutical company, this is not how we think. A vast number of our team consists of clinicians (physicians, pharmacists, nurses, etc) who are dedicated to bringing new therapies that are safer and more effective than what’s currently out there. I work in Phase I/II development, and I know (indirectly) all my patients on my studies. I come home sad when they do poorly, and I’m ecstatic when they do well.

April 18, 2018

Advertisement

Hot topics